Saturday, July 3, 2010

Review: Love You Hate You Miss You by Elizabeth Scott


You know, I always thought I told you everything, but there are some things I should have said but never did. I should have told you about the time I lost your new sunglasses. I know you really liked them. I should have apologized the time I ruined your brand-new skirt, the one with the beading. I should have apologized for a lot of stuff.

I’m sorry. I’m sorry for everything.


It's been seventy five days. Amy's sick of her parents suddenly taking an interest in her, and she's really sick of people asking her about Julia. Julia's gone, and Amy doesn't want to talk about it. No one knew Julia like she did. No one gets what life is without her.

No one understands what it's like to know that it's all your fault.

Amy's shrink thinks she should keep a journal but instead, Amy starts writing letters to Julia. As she writes letter after letter, she begins to realize that the past holds its own secrets--and that the present deserves a chance.
 -
Plot: 4/5
Creativity: 4/5
Characters: 4/5
Writing:5/5
Impact: 5/5
Overall: 4/5

I am a huge fan of Elizabeth Scott's. From the moment I picked up her debut novel, Bloom, I knew I found one of my favorite YA authors of all time. I always find myself able to identify with the heroines of her stories, and her romances leave me breathless and giddy at the same time. However, until recently, I didn't try to venture into her darker, more serious books. In a way, I was sort of worried that I would end up not liking them. Luckily, reading Love You Hate You Miss You did not leave me feeling that way at all. If anything, it only reinforced my love for Elizabeth Scott and her spectacular stories.

Amy's best friend Julia dies in an accident, and Amy is left miserable and ridden with guilt. In attempt to deal with the pain of her friend's death, Amy writes letters  to Julia in a form of a  journal. There she pours out her feelings about her life not only after the accident, but before as well, and she begins to learn more about herself and how to live without Julia, her rock, her better half, by her side.

I initially didn't like the character of Amy, which was a first for me in an Elizabeth Scott novel. I didn't like the things she said and did, and I thought she was selfish and turbulent. But as I read on, I learned to love her character. She's flawed, but she has her reasons for not being perfect. In the story she goes through so much pain, and the loss of Julia almost pushes her to her breaking point. She comes off as rebellious and there are times when she makes the wrong choices, but those things make her all the more human- she has her secrets, her ups and her downs, and at the end of the day she's just a girl trying to find her way around life. She's concrete. She's real.

The story and the premise of LYHYMY are equally wonderful. I was glued to the pages! I just had to keep on reading. I wanted the story to envelop me, to eat me all up. It was all I could think about, and I was very irritated during the moments I had to put the book down. The plot is sad, raw, and moving to a point where there were times when I found myself on the verge of tears. It's phenomenal.

LYHYMY is a fine, unconventional read that is gripping all throughout. Elizabeth Scott does it again with this novel as she spins together a maginificent story of love, loss, friendship, and heartbreak that will make readers think, laugh and cry at the same time. I really enjoyed this book, and I'm definitely going to read it again; and I recommend it to anyone who wants to read a unique YA novel of true substance.

3 comments:

  1. As this is a dark YA I think I will try it and enjoy it.

    Good review.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Great review Erika! I haven't read an Elizabeth Scott book. But from the things that people are saying about her writing and her books, she must be great! I saw this one at the bookstore. I didn't pick it up though and now I haven't found a copy again.

    ReplyDelete
  3. fantastic review i fell in love with this book, and i grew to really care for her probably Elizabeth Scott best work as of yet

    ReplyDelete